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Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

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Fiorino wins 2019 Levine Prize

Each year, the International Political Science Association’s Research Committee on the Structure of Governance sponsors the Levine Prize. It is named in honor of Charles H. Levine, who was a distinguished member of the Research Committee and served on the editorial board of its official journal, Governance. The prize is awarded on the recommendation of a distinguished committee for the best book on comparative administration or public policy published in the previous year. This year’s committee was composed of Professors Linda White (University of Toronto, Canada), Kutsal Yesilkagit (Leiden University, The Netherlands) and Robert Cox (University of South Carolina, United States).

The Award Committee has selected “A Good Life on a Finite Earth: The Political goodlifeEconomy of Green Growth,” by Daniel J. Fiorino (American University, United States) as the 2019 recipient of the Levine Award. The book develops a coherent argument for how green growth is possible, and why it is a necessary priority for governments in the 21st Century. According to Fiorino, the concept of green growth outlines a developmental goal that balances ecological and social as well as economic benefits. It is an orientation to economic development that is advocated by a wide array of international agencies and that has inspired a great deal of innovative policies in countries around the world.

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July 18, 2019 at 12:24 pm

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July 2019 Issue Now Available

The July 2019 issue is now available!

First page image

Written by Governance

July 15, 2019 at 9:33 am

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How active are non-state actors in global governance?

“Should I stay or should I go? Explaining variation in nonstate actor advocacy over time in global governance

Marcel Hanegraaf, Jorik Vergauwen & Jan Beyers

Since the end of the Cold War, the international community has witnessed a proliferation of non-state actors (NSAs) participating in global governance. In 2016 there were more than 68,000 registered transnational NSAs. But despite their sheer growth, few of them actually manage to have a sustained global impact. Marcel Hanegraaf, Jorik Vergauwen and Jan Beyers adopt a novel approach to existing research by producing a mapping that captures the differences between core and peripheral NSAs based on their level of activity over time. To do so, they conducted a quantitative analysis of all NSAs that were active at the Conferences of the Parties of the United Nations Framework on Climate Change Conventions (COP and UNFCCC) between 1997 and 2011. What they show is that much of the advocacy in this field is of an incidental nature and that many NSAs only attended the conference once. They further find that the higher the number of participating NSAs, the lower the number of repeat players participating at conferences while the number of ‘policy tourists’ increases. Hanegraf, Vergauwen and Beyers thus underscore the need to push beyond aggregate numbers by demonstrating that transnational NSA communities consist of a small core of active policy participants that frequently participate in relevant fora and a larger number of peripheral NSAs who lack repeat appearances.

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July 15, 2019 at 9:23 am

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Book reviews: Building state capability, and the politics of evidence

In the current issue of Governance, Richard Allen reviews Building State Capability: Evidence, Analysis, Action by Matt Andrews, Lant Pritchett and Michael Woolcock. The authors propose an approach to governance reform in developing countries andrews coverthat emphasizes locally customized “best fit” solutions, combined with experimentation and a broad‐based dialogue among the development partners and other actors in the reform process. Read the review. Caroline Heider reviews The Politics of Evidence: From Evidence‐Based Policy to the Good Governance of Evidence by Justin Parkhurst. In this “post‐truth era,” the author demonstrates systems that can be built to ensure policies are better informed by evidence, while also pointing out why evidence cannot and should not be the sole driver in policymaking. Read the review.

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March 26, 2018 at 10:27 am

Democracy promotion: “Politically engaged best practice”

Critics of donor-funded democracy promotion projects complain that they are naive attempts to replicate the practices of developed countries.  David Guinn and Jeffrey Straussman say that the reality is more complicated.  They describe a more nuanced approach to democracy promotion, which they call “politically engaged best practice,” and show how it can be applied to the task of legislative strengthening in developing countries.  Politically engaged programming still recognizes that there are best practices, but allows room for development agencies and implementers to consider how practices should be adjusted to fit “social and cultural systems.”  Read the article.

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March 15, 2017 at 7:37 pm

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New books by SOG members

Several SOG members contribute to a new book, Public Administration Reforms in Europe: The View From the Top, just published by Edward Elgar.  Based on a survey of more than 6700 top civil servants in 17 European countries, this book explores the impacts of New Public Management (NPM)-style reforms in Europe.  More about the book.  Steven Van de Walle discusses the book in a short comment here.
If you are a SOG member and have a new book, let us know.  Join SOG here.  The SOG newsletter reaches over five thousand academics and professionals around the world.

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August 22, 2016 at 12:40 pm

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Book reviews: Corruption and the right to information

In the current issue of Governance, Carolyn Warner reviews The Quest for Good Governance by Alina Mungiu-Pippidi. “It has yet to occur to the international community that corrupt actors rarely, if ever, reform themselves out of business,” Warner says.  “Mungiu-Pippidi’s work is a significant contribution to our understanding of the subject, and one to which policymakers and international donors should pay attention.”  Read the review.
And Gaia von Hatzfeldt reviews Democracy and Transparency in the Indian State by Sharma Prashant.  India’s 2005 Right to Information Act “is lauded for being both a producer and a product of an empowered and active citizenry,” von Hatzfeldt says.   “Sharma Prashant provocatively and astutely questions this assumed correlation between the RTI and democratic processes.” Read the review.

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August 10, 2016 at 12:39 pm

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