The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Archive for the ‘Blog comments’ Category

Brexit:  A tale of two ‘publics’

DSC_7705 copyBy Joleen Steyn Kotze.  The story of Brexit and its shock victory brings the possibility of using African conceptual tools to analyze complex European cosmopolitanism and citizenship.

Peter Ekeh, a renowned African thinker on African civic citizenship, conceptualized his notion of ‘two publics’ to explain Africa’s socio-political division. For Ekeh, post-colonial states were not one civic public like in Western nation- states. Rather, African polities comprised two publics with different rights and citizenship obligations. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Governance

July 5, 2016 at 2:39 pm

Posted in Blog comments, Brexit

Brexit and the EU: A new deal for all the EU or no deal at all? 

SchmidtBy Vivien Schmidt.  Now that the UK has voted to leave the EU, all the attention has been focused on how it will go about leaving, or even whether it will leave in the end.  But equally important is how the EU responds to Brexit:  whether as an isolated case to be quarantined in order to avoid contagion to other member-states, or as the symptom of a wider disease.  Only by seeing the Brexit vote as a wake-up call to reinvent the EU may the EU itself actually overcome the many challenges it faces.  What the EU must do is to generate a ‘new deal’ for the EU as a whole, not to treat the UK in isolation.

The EU will probably treat the UK as exceptional, as the result of populist Euroskepticism gone mad in a country ill-served by a conservative party trying to solve its internal divisions via referendum, drip-fed anti-EU rhetoric by the tabloids, where the EU has been the scapegoat for the UK’s many home-grown problems.  The EU is therefore likely to hunker down, to protect all the acquis so valiantly fought for over the years—including the freedom of movement of EU citizens that has been a major focus of the Leave campaign. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Governance

June 29, 2016 at 8:15 am

Posted in Blog comments, Brexit

The perils of technocratism: Will environmentalists learn from Brexit?

By Nives Dolsak and Aseem Prakash.  What do the Brexit vote, the rise of Trump and Sanders, and apathy towards climate change mitigation have in common? The perils of relying on technocratism to justify policy choices.

Much will be written on why the British have voted for Brexit. There are already dire predictions about the future of the United Kingdom, the European Union, and the world economy. Mainstream newspapers are puzzled as to why the British voted for the exit even though it might hurt them. They blame populism, the rise of the far right, fears about immigration, economic globalization and so on.

While this is true, the mainstream media has not seriously engaged with the source of voter dissatisfaction with the EU. More broadly, we ought to ask: why are voters less willing to take marching orders from the economic and scientific elites? Why are they willing to follow the populist leaders who peddle simplistic solutions for complex problems instead?   Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Governance

June 27, 2016 at 2:26 pm

Posted in Blog comments, Brexit

Governance editorial board members on Brexit decision

Professor Wade Jacoby of Brigham Young University, a member of Governance‘s editorial board,  posted this quick reflection on the UK’s vote to leave the European Union on his Facebook page on Friday.  This note is reproduced with permission.  Other reactions from Governance contributors and readers are welcome.  Contact the editors or post below.

I rarely post on Facebook, but I wanted to express to my European friends my sadness at yesterday’s outcome. The Brexit vote will feel like a personal wound to very many Americans. It certainly does to me and Kindra. Aside from a train trip with my grandmother to Disneyland when I was eight, I never left a small corner of the Pacific Northwest (Alaska and Washington) until I was 21. Then I went to the UK for six months in 1985. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Governance

June 24, 2016 at 6:49 pm

Posted in Blog comments, Brexit

Reply to Coen & Pegram: Three ways to fix global governance research

seddon-Cropped-154x200Jack A. Seddon replies to our conversation on the Coen/Pegram commentary on global governance research:  With three simple observations, I would like to concur with the call for a third generation of global governance research. I would further agree with Professors Coen and Pegram that global governance is failing, though it is probably too much—and a wholly ungenerous reading of the understandably polemical call to arms published in Governance—to assert that it is failing equally everywhere. My only comment is that the ubiquitous backsliding and inadequacy that characterises much of what constitutes global governance is probably only a surprise to the second generation of global governance scholarship. This, if correct, suggests three relatively concrete things about the next generation of research. Global governance analysis needs to be less functionalist and conceptual, more attuned to power and political conflict, and better grounded in its empirical claims. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Governance

November 26, 2015 at 12:42 pm

Reply to Coen and Pegram: The global liberal system is more fragile than you think

TiberghienYves Tiberghien replies to a commentary on global governance research by David Coen and Tom Pegram: David Coen and Tom Pegram are right on two counts: our current global governance system is not working and our current theories of global governance are too fragmented to help us analyze the situation and suggest improvements. Yet, the problem is even more serious than what they describe. In fact, the current combination of systemic risks, dramatic power shift, and entropic forces facing our existing global governance architecture could well overwhelm it. And we could well miss it until it is too late.

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Written by Governance

November 1, 2015 at 9:46 am

The Canadian federal election: What it means for policy and politics

Borins SBy Sandford Borins.  The results of the Oct. 19 Canadian election were both definitive and surprising: a majority government for the Liberal Party of Canada, which in the previous election had run third and was in danger of disappearing, and the defeat of a decade-old Conservative regime that had won the three previous elections by increasing margins and governed with ruthless political efficiency. Though public sentiment that it was time for a change had grown, the two major left-of-centre parties, the Liberals and the New Democrats, were competing with one another to capitalize on that sentiment. The Liberal Party won the election with a platform that moved noticeably to the left, a leader who conveyed optimism and passion, and an advertising campaign that overcame the Conservatives’ expertise in negativism.

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Written by Governance

October 22, 2015 at 10:23 am