The GOVERNANCE blog

Governance: An international journal of policy, administration and institutions

Fiorino wins 2019 Levine Prize

Each year, the International Political Science Association’s Research Committee on the Structure of Governance sponsors the Levine Prize. It is named in honor of Charles H. Levine, who was a distinguished member of the Research Committee and served on the editorial board of its official journal, Governance. The prize is awarded on the recommendation of a distinguished committee for the best book on comparative administration or public policy published in the previous year. This year’s committee was composed of Professors Linda White (University of Toronto, Canada), Kutsal Yesilkagit (Leiden University, The Netherlands) and Robert Cox (University of South Carolina, United States).

The Award Committee has selected “A Good Life on a Finite Earth: The Political goodlifeEconomy of Green Growth,” by Daniel J. Fiorino (American University, United States) as the 2019 recipient of the Levine Award. The book develops a coherent argument for how green growth is possible, and why it is a necessary priority for governments in the 21st Century. According to Fiorino, the concept of green growth outlines a developmental goal that balances ecological and social as well as economic benefits. It is an orientation to economic development that is advocated by a wide array of international agencies and that has inspired a great deal of innovative policies in countries around the world.

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Written by Governance

July 18, 2019 at 12:24 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

July 2019 Issue Now Available

The July 2019 issue is now available!

First page image

Written by Governance

July 15, 2019 at 9:33 am

Posted in Uncategorized

How active are non-state actors in global governance?

“Should I stay or should I go? Explaining variation in nonstate actor advocacy over time in global governance

Marcel Hanegraaf, Jorik Vergauwen & Jan Beyers

Since the end of the Cold War, the international community has witnessed a proliferation of non-state actors (NSAs) participating in global governance. In 2016 there were more than 68,000 registered transnational NSAs. But despite their sheer growth, few of them actually manage to have a sustained global impact. Marcel Hanegraaf, Jorik Vergauwen and Jan Beyers adopt a novel approach to existing research by producing a mapping that captures the differences between core and peripheral NSAs based on their level of activity over time. To do so, they conducted a quantitative analysis of all NSAs that were active at the Conferences of the Parties of the United Nations Framework on Climate Change Conventions (COP and UNFCCC) between 1997 and 2011. What they show is that much of the advocacy in this field is of an incidental nature and that many NSAs only attended the conference once. They further find that the higher the number of participating NSAs, the lower the number of repeat players participating at conferences while the number of ‘policy tourists’ increases. Hanegraf, Vergauwen and Beyers thus underscore the need to push beyond aggregate numbers by demonstrating that transnational NSA communities consist of a small core of active policy participants that frequently participate in relevant fora and a larger number of peripheral NSAs who lack repeat appearances.

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July 15, 2019 at 9:23 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Book reviews: Building state capability, and the politics of evidence

In the current issue of Governance, Richard Allen reviews Building State Capability: Evidence, Analysis, Action by Matt Andrews, Lant Pritchett and Michael Woolcock. The authors propose an approach to governance reform in developing countries andrews coverthat emphasizes locally customized “best fit” solutions, combined with experimentation and a broad‐based dialogue among the development partners and other actors in the reform process. Read the review. Caroline Heider reviews The Politics of Evidence: From Evidence‐Based Policy to the Good Governance of Evidence by Justin Parkhurst. In this “post‐truth era,” the author demonstrates systems that can be built to ensure policies are better informed by evidence, while also pointing out why evidence cannot and should not be the sole driver in policymaking. Read the review.

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March 26, 2018 at 10:27 am

Miller and Whitford win Levine Prize

Each year, the International Political Science Association’s Research Committee on the Structure of Governance sponsors the Levine Prize. It is named in honour of Charles H. Levine, who was a distinguished member of the Research Committee and served on the editorial board of its official journal, Governance. The prize is awarded on the recommendation of a distinguished committee. This year’s committee was composed of Professors Tobias Bach (University of Oslo), Caspar van den Berg (Leiden University), and Ting Gong (City University of Hong Kong).

9781107008755The Award Committee has selected Above Politics: Bureaucratic Discretion and Credible Commitment by Gary J. Miller and Andrew B. Whitford as the 2017 recipient of the Levine Award. This interesting book turns much of the conventional wisdom about opportunistic and self-interested bureaucrats as the main problem of democratic governance upside down. Through a series of insightful vignettes and case studies, the authors powerfully argue that the moral hazard faced by politicians is a more serious problem than the proverbial runaway bureaucracy. They emphasize the benefits of a professionalized bureaucracy as a key element of checks and balances in the US system of separated powers and highlight the problematic effects of politicization on policy effectiveness. Written in an accessible style, the book will be useful as a reading for courses in different fields. Read the rest of this entry »

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July 12, 2017 at 11:30 am

Posted in Levine Book Prize

Book reviews: Do-it-yourself democracy, smarter states

 

In the current issue of GovernanceRobert Chaskin reviews Do-It-Yourself Democracy by Caroline W. Lee.  Lee’s analysis is “unsettling,” Chaskin says, showing how deliberative processes can be designed “in ways that legitimize cost cutting and retrenchment and that promote participant alignment with state or corporate requirements for austerity.  Read the review.  And Scott Fritzen reviews Smart Citizens, Smarter State by Beth Simone Noveck.  The book “makes an impassioned plea for ‘reinventing government’ in the twenty-first century.”  Fritzen says that Noveck’s analysis is “nuanced, grounded in historical analysis, practical experience in government, multiple disciplines and a close reading of democratic and institutional theory.”  Read the review.

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April 25, 2017 at 3:54 pm

What drives legitimacy in post-conflict societies?

Rebuilding institutional legitimacy is essential for stability in postconflict societies.  But what factors influence citizen perceptions of legitimacy?  Kylie Fisk and Adrian Cherney answer the question using data from a nationwide study of post-conflict governance in Nepal.  They find that the relationship between service delivery and legitimacy “is not as simple as previously assumed.”  Procedural justice is more strongly associated with perceptions of legitimacy than instrumental outcomes such as service delivery, distributive justice, and outcome favorability. Read the article.

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April 15, 2017 at 7:42 pm

Posted in Current issue